‘Great Cultural Knock About!’ Narrative – and Theme… my BEEF workshop feedback

Theme is one of my favourite subjects to teach as it informs the heart of any piece of creative work, whether it be film, fiction writing, theatre, photography, non fiction, textile work… you name it. Plus it’s about emotion, which is the cornerstone of creating anything meaningful. This workshop, and my recent Creative Sparkle workshops have taken me back to the material I taught on the Narrative MA module at Norwich University of the Arts (I loved that job!).

Film maker Dr Vicki Smith asked me to run a workshop at BEEF over the summer. A privilege to be running the first in a series at BEEF’s current home: The People’s Republic of Stokes Croft.

BEEF – Bristol Experimental and Expanded Film – describes itself as ‘a film and sound collective with an analogue heart’, it’s well worth looking up and getting involved in. Vicky is a true experimental film maker and thinker and it’s been great to get to know her through this.

It’s a joy working with creative people, giving them a pile of tools to explore and improve their work and sharing stories. In these workshops – there is a cultural knock about, as one of the workshop attendees wrote in their feedback. Indeed – I view any workshop as essentially being a process of, ‘I am nourishing you and you are nourishing me.’

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More about the workshop details:

Details: SATURDAY 30th July  at BEEF’s current home: The People’s Republic of Stokes Croft, 14 Hillgrove St, Bristol.

DAY ONE :  EXPLORING YOUR MEDIUM
This set of workshops may be taken singly or together. Close attention will be paid to the role of sound and the senses in experimental film, the advantages and creative applications of different film formats and the consideration of audience.

10-12 am: Elspeth Penny: Narrative – Communicating through Media

A narrative is the unfolding of a structured communication to an audience. Story, genre, time, space, theme, style, plot, characterisation and dialogue, sound, movement, image. This workshop uses practical exercises to explore theme – and how a well worked out theme affects everything we communicate.

Elspeth Penny makes films, tv, literature, theatre…. always ideas led. An experienced creative workshop leader, Elspeth has taught for over fifteen years, including running an MA module in Narrative at Norwich University of the Arts, and loves to work with people of any age and level of experience.

More at:  http://www.beefbristol.org/portfolio/break-the-rules-beef-experimental-film-workshops/

 

Now for the feedback.

Thank you to all of the participants who gave feedback:

 

Very open and dynamic in approach. It did need more time perhaps! Good location and resources. Made me think more about the direction of my work and how to develop it.

 

The exercises were good and energizing and brought the group together in a dynamic and creative way. The film and book examples were well chosen. The exercise at the end of using colours, projection and camera to rapidly explore a filmic theme was really fun and a great idea for an explorative tool.

 

– The creative exercises are very inspiring and helpful.

– The drawing on overhead and filming is brilliant help to see your theme in action.

– It could be an hour longer.

– Please do more of these workshops.

 

Really stretched by boundaries.

Felt like I could think more freely.

Very interesting.

Wow have something/pointers to take away and follow up.

Thanks.

 

Good points.

  1. GREAT CULTURAL ROCK ABOUT
  2. Made me relax and share
  3. Great set of tool kit to go away with that could be transferred to all/most creative processes.
  4. Great sense of security in the group.

Points to improve

?? Too much in 2 hours. Needs a day.

Thanks a lot.

 

Note to self: Don’t try to do too much in an hour!

Thanks to Vicky and Esther for your help in planning and on the day.

 

 

Letter to my lungs: Spring 2016

 

Breathe Easy, the Forest of Dean April 19th 2016

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‘My Dear Breath, I have lived with you for 83 years, the first 23 were good! but you have been unkind’ – one eighty-five year-old, Clare, writes to her own breath in large pink letters – she’s been using Beetroot ink and a feather to write with. She tells me she had Asthma since she was a child, ‘I used to wonder if I’d wake up dead.’

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It’s the first time I’ve been to the Forest of Dean. I get to Great Oaks Hospice, Coleford an hour early. A man is cleaning a lawn mower, whistling away, and I feel at ease. I consider how I’d not mind spending time at any hospice if I could hear someone going about his tasks so happily. He helps me carry in four boxes and several bunches of different coloured rolled up paper into a warm open room in the basement. I set up, ready for the Breathe Easy group to arrive.

I have arranged to do something for the first half of the meeting for Forest of Dean Breathe Easy group. Mike Green is Secretary of the group – he and his wife greet me, then the participants begin to arrive.

‘This looks interesting, intriguing!’ says one slim friendly man, Archie. The table is all set with tablecloth, homemade inks, pens, pencils, chalks, charcoal. There is something about him that reminds me of my Geordie grandfather Grumpy. Grumpy had chronic bronchitis from years of dedicated smoking and spent the last fifteen,or was it twenty years of his life? – looked after by Gran – he was largely bedridden towards the end.

As we start the workshop, there are six people at the table, and a few more trickle in until we are thirteen.

I introduce myself and tell the group how I have developed my letter-writing project Scent (www.scent.buzz). I warm up with a drama exercise using the breath, play a specific kind of consequences, appropriate for the group, ask everyone to write five messages to their five-year-old self in the past, then ask everyone to write a letter to their own breath.

Mark is a jovial man whom I immediately feel at ease with: he chats to me about parenting boys and various theatre pieces he’s seen.

‘I wrote a letter to my lungs actually,’ he tells me. He has written, ‘We are behind you with this’ at the bottom of his chosen piece of humble white A4 paper. He continues – ‘It has helped me to be less critical of myself. That’s because of the five messages that you asked us to write to ourselves as a child.’

It’s harder to be mean to a child, so addressing ourselves this way does tend to help us be more compassionate with ourselves.

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‘My letter is basically all about what breath and I can do together’, Clare tells me, with a little regret in her voice. She then says more cheerfully, ‘This is another way we look at ourselves and our illnesses – there is a lot we can do without medication.’

Everyone reacts to the workshop in their own individual way. Participants talk to their breath in tones ranging from kindness and friendship to reprimand, such as Clare’s, ‘But you have been unkind.’

There’s a discussion in the group about whether keeping the letters is a good idea. I suggest that they might like to pin them up to remind themselves.

I know from previous groups that people have admitted that they think their partners will laugh at them if they pin them up. It’s not out of unkindness, but perhaps out of embarrassment about expressing emotions or needs.

Mark tells me that he’ll take it home and throw it out, the way everything else goes in his house. One participant suggests to him that he might benefit from seeing it – why not put it on your wall?’ He considers it, then he says that he’d like to keep it for a while.

Here’s another thoughtful extract.

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It’s tea and raffle time. I am offered a raffle ticket, but I say that I wouldn’t like to win and take away the prize from one of the others. The raffle master insists. Luckily I don’t win.

‘I think we all enjoyed that and wish you were here for longer. Perhaps you could come back?’ Mike tells me.

‘That was tremendous. I really did get a lot from that’, Carol says as I’m leaving.

A few days later I get a letter through the post from Mike:

‘Your workshop last Tuesday gave our Breathe Easy members food for thought and a creative outlet not experienced often enough on third Tuesdays in the Acorn Suite. I hope you agree that the varied response, in words and images, is proof of the value of the afternoon to those present, not least the fun of it.

Mary tells me that the procession of the exercises led her to realise she could rise above negativity and begin again to enjoy life.’

I am both moved and humbled, in particular by Mary’s feedback. To me it shows that this is not just simply about letter writing and communicating to some part of yourself, as profound as that might be. It’s also a procession of exercises, a progression of ideas, a transition which participants can go through. If it helps a single person to ‘begin again to enjoy life’ then it’s worth doing.

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Thank you to: Mike Green, chair of the Forest of Dean Breath Easy group for all his help and for the photos (when I discovered I’d left behind my camera); all the participants, whose names have been changed for purposes of privacy; Great Oaks Hospice, Coleford for their welcome; Dr Alice Malpass, NIHR Research Fellow for referring me to Forest of Dean Breath Easy group after we both delivered talks at the Life of Breath research group; Jess- Farr Cox; Philosopher Professor Havi Carel,  http://www.lifeofbreath.org/ for inviting me to talk at her Wellcome Project Funded project research group in Bristol.

Elspeth’s letter writing project Scent can be found at http://www.scent.buzz or via http://www.2buproductions.org