Arts residency at The Mothership

My 16 year-old son and I were invited by Anna Best to do an arts residency at The Mothership in Dorset at the end of October 2018.  This is an account of that week.

We know that we will be doing some work together.  We don’t know what we’ll be exploring exactly, and we’re given the freedom to not know. No result is expected – this is luxurious, even decadent, in the best possible way. We’re both at periods of life where there is transformation and change. He will leave home soon, maybe next year, maybe in two years, so I will be looking at what this means to me. I know I want to go deep into whatever I explore.

Practicalities first. We are staying in a studio overlooking a giant oak.

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Anna’s beans are drying on one of the shelves:

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We have a compost loo which we’ll share with other people, there is no internet. Chris is next door with Simone the dog.  We have a vast landscape to wonder in, including a disused railway line. Bridport is 20 minutes drive away and there’s everything we need there, including food shops, pubs and cafes. I’ve brought most of what we need anyway. There are other rural local produce shops and pubs nearby, and it’s not so far from the sea. I pour over maps to get my bearings as I don’t know the area at all. We are near Powerstock, not far from Bridport, and oddly close to places we used to go when we lived in Devon, such as Lyme Regis.

We will present our work at a showing for Force 8 on Friday, 5 days into our residency.  http://force8.org is  “a creative collective of artists, writers, designers and musicians founded by Anna Best and Hester Schofield in 2016 to promote a culture of thinking  and progressive dialogue through contemporary art that will inspire people in Bridport and the surrounding area.”

Where to start? There are many resources available to us: Resource 1. we have brought books. Some are his choice, some are mine.IMG_6998

Resource 2: a random selection of materials. The combination of them is in itself of interest to me. I’ve brought wood cutting tools, paper, inks made out of soil, he’s got threads, wool, knitting needles, an antique wooden milk crate full of materials including paints.

Resource 3: there is a lot of extraordinary nature outside, so our palette is full and there are endless textures and colours to find.

 

Resource 4: In our application for the residency, we started from a statement that Bede attributed to Plato –  “Inside everything, there is a perfect form“ which I think he picked up from studying Ethics and Philosophy. Another way of putting this is that everything in this world is an imperfect representation of its perfect form.

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Resource 5: In the summer we were in North Wales and my mother, sister, cousin, my children and I had walked to the beach for a swim. On the walk down, Bede made me a boat to hurl away into the sea, as it was my birthday.  It was rainy and cold and it was the perfect thing to do. I have brought the photo of this.

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Resource 6. Making letters to an aspect of self is my thing…. so I would like to do this. Writing letters to the breath every day makes it easier to catch the journey of the week in the writing – they  somehow catch the nub of each day. They give the whole thing a slow paced rhythmic quality.

The first thing I do is ditch any idea of a plan, or a list or any tightening around my waist. I do keep looking out to check Bede is ok though….

Watching your mother go into a deep creative zone in an almost off grid rural location and having no-one else about isn’t every son’s dream. And you might be amazed he actually came at all. Well so am I, and it isn’t all smooth…

“How long are we here for?” he says on day 2, impatiently.

“Seven days” I say.

“But what exactly are we doing here?”

“Making things, I don’t know, it doesn’t matter. Just making art. You know that. You wanted to come!”

” I don’t want to do an arts project, he says. I want to be at home.”DSC_0459

And there was the ‘You’re so deep mum’. It wasn’t a complement.

‘Yes, I am.’ I say, simply and get on with sewing fragments of text onto a piece of paper.

After that he settles in, or just gives in and finds what this is about for him. Unstructured time, un-led… no one is telling us what to do and there really aren’t many people around… all this is fine. It’s such a contrast to the stitched up quality and quantity of time in the rest of life… school, jobs, volunteering, walks, Duke of Edinburgh, Ten Tors, and so on. There is certainly no manual of how to go about making a piece of work here. Physically and in atmosphere, the place is remarkably like the farm we were lucky to be able to live on in mid Devon for eight years, before we moved to North Somerset.

I offer to give him structure, which he refuses, but I throw out a few lines in case he wanted to catch them. Such as a quote I’d been told at a wedding the day before we’d left. “When you change the things you notice, the things you notice change.” This goes down surprisingly well.

DSC_0462But if we’re open to noticing the perfect form of everything, then which parts of what we encounter will get sketched onto my notepad, or scratched into something he is making? What form will we use to pull it into a piece of work? Will we even make a piece of work together?

The time we have at The Mothership is during the week of the end of October, our Halloween; this was once seen as the thirteenth month. I read about October and November in Ian Siddons Heginworth’s book ‘Environmental Arts Therapy and The Tree of Life, A monthly guide for your soul’s journey on this beautiful earth.’ I read slowly as I like to let the thoughts of writers that I like seep through me, not just over me… though perhaps I’m just slow, and it’s my way of justifying it. His words make more sense to me whilst in this landscape than they would have done at home. You might say they enter me as much as the surroundings, the elements, the fierce winds on our last night there.

We don’t garden as we’d thought we would, so it is more about the landscape, the stories, the fire, the materials we find in these places. We visit the sea and the fossil cliffs.

 

We have walks in the forest next to the house,  alone and together in various changing lights.

”I’m blowing through the elder” he says. ‘It’s pithy inside. You can easily remove the pith”. He’s carved out holes and blows the top, I hear it make a trembling airy sound. Then he shaves a bit more, and the sound disappears. That’s perfect, I think. It’s a silent recorder. And just then steam shoots out of a log.”

Everyone who walks into the space or we come upon becomes part of the work. The stories of everyone who we talk to, influence us or are woven in. The theme seems to be around cuts, threads, sewing up, tracks, circles. A saying goodbye, and a what next? Quite often words elude me, and I confuse words with others – he’s quick to point it out. That’s creative brain at work. He’s got to write an application to a school. It irritates me to have to get that bit of my brain out (the left hemisphere), but of course I’m going to help. I don’t want him to leave home just yet, yet if that’s what he needs, that must happen. We go to an internet cafe to do it.

So in the end how do you choose the right thing to put into this grand sketch of a mother-son moment in time, and what to leave out? Perspective is necessary, to distinguish between the irrelevant details and if no-one else is there to do it, eg a dramaturg, a work partner, it takes longer. I’m already making excuses for the unformed quality of my work. Yet there’s a joy in staying as free in ideas as possible for as long as possible. On Thursday night, I  start to create something in script form. I am still pulling threads together when Hester and Anna arrive at 5 pm on Friday for the showing. Bede has lit a fire dish outside.

I haven’t expected it, but the making of objects, the formation of ideas, our creative journey becomes the main thread of the script. There is also something emerging about rising to the challenge of being an elder, in spite of not really wanting to be.

The showing

A fire dish. Stories. Everyone who is there tells a story, each one brings something new to the circle.

This is Bede’s story, though it’s changed and refined and perhaps got both more factually accurate and more poetic in retellings since. ‘If you cast your eye across the bay towards Plymouth, you can see Eddystone Lighthouse. Eddystone built his lighthouse out of wood and glass, and to show off how well built it, he decided to sleep over inside it, for the first night it after it was completed.  And that night a great storm came, an unlikely storm, and swept it all away, and him with it. So I was on the sea, on the way to France, thinking of this story. I looked out of the horizon and I could see the world was round. You can’t get that perspective on land. We can make the land straight by building railways, but the sea will always be round. Railways were built across America, they cut off Buffalo paths. We westerners build roads, square buildings, straight lines…”

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Bede also shows what he made… the silent elder recorder. A bamboo pen. A mini church door.  A book bound in leather and filled with painted images: the images illustrate cell division. A thick knitted something which ‘has not become anything yet’, but then becomes a circle, a cowl. He tells a story around a fire dish. He composes a song.

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I make a series of letters, in ink and red thread. Seven stories joined by breaths, stitches, insults, home truths. I then write a 24 minute script which is finding what it is.

What does Bede think about what we have made? He likes the fires and the stories but he doesn’t want to hear what I have written. Of course. But he doesn’t mind I’ve written it.

What do I think of what we have made? Perhaps I have made something out of the extraordinary ordinary – this place, the occasion, just having a week to play with. Or even something ordinary extraordinary? I like it when Anna says the studio looks like we’ve been living there for weeks – I suppose we have let ourselves get pretty messy at times. I hope I have not been sentimental, and I hope it gets people feeling something, but know I’ll need to do a lot of cutting.

When I read my words, I see that my metaphors are thick and deep, where as Bede’s thoughts are so clear, even if not simple. Does this make him a better artist than me?  I know the detail can confuse the whole, and I need time to work out which is which.

What medium should this writing end up as, I ask at the showing. I’m not so sure yet. Theatre? Radio? Novellette? Long poem? Hester suggests it’s radio, it’s so internal. “You really need to stop and listen to the words, the words are enough in themselves.” I agree, and think that the character called Time could blossom if on radio. Hester sees it as a working through, an interpretation of a dream, or the unconscious, through referencing the every day. Anna says that though some of the references are familiar (she’s lived her for some time, and visited since a child), that this doesn’t make it dull. Knowing a place for years, seeing it through seasons and periods of life, seeing the same thing again and again just makes it richer, deeper, and hearing about it from different perspectives is part of that depth.

Yes – life gives everything we need.  When you change the things you notice, the things you notice change.

I ask Hester and Anna to create their own letters to the breath which they do, speedily. I hang them next to my letters, at the window overlooking the oak tree.

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Then they tell their own stories beside the fire. Both pick up on themes and leave something new to this story. We blow breaths to each other and receive them back and then go back to our lives.

This whole thing is a walk through something, the 13thmonth, a ritual, a song.  It feels as though it touched something honest and true, but I can’t yet understand it  – how could I?

I look up my notes of a workshop I went to the week before the residency, about building your dream idea. One of the exercises is a visualisation. I read my account of the visualisation – my vision if you like: it’s about a tall lighthouse by the sea, I am at the top of it talking to a big crowd, helping millions of them see differently. Let’s hope that vision doesn’t get dashed into the sea, I’ll have to build it with better materials than Eddyson used.

My youngest son comes for the last day, after his trip to London where he spent time with my mother. He’s been to the holocaust exhibition at The Imperial War Museum and played Fortnight with his cousin. I encourage him to create something. This is what he makes: IMG_6979

“So for now the cycle is ending…. Down by the water’s edge, our ship awaits” writes Ian Siddons Heginworth

Thank you to:

The Mothership and Anna

Bede

Iris

Ian Siddons Heginworth; Environmental Arts Therapy and The Tree of Life, A monthly guide for your soul’s journey on this beautiful earth’

Hester, for recommending ‘If Women Rose Rooted: A journey to Authenticity and Belonging’ by Sharon Blackie, which I’ve been reading since.

Richard Mabey’s Flora Britannia

Christopher Hammond

Serena Inskip

The Viking I met at Adele and Nic’s wedding.

Eggardon Hill, which we could see each day, and our friends at 3CaneWhale whose beautiful song ‘Eggardon Hill’, sent little ripples to us throughout the week.

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What people are saying about Silva Lining’s Care Plan

Silva Lining’s Care Plan…. Three brains, two bodies, one secret plan: an absurd journey into the invisible world of carers. Written and directed by Elspeth Penny

See Silva Lining’s Care Plan trailer

Developed in collaboration with University of Nottingham, based on real care diaries, Silva Lining’s Care Plan shines a light on the experiences of paid carers of individuals with dementia.

What people are saying:

“Silva Lining’s Care Plan is a wonderful and moving exploration of the complex relationship between carer and cared for. Both heart-rending and laugh-out-loud, it takes you on a roller-coaster of an emotional journey through Silva Lining’s story, with many an amusing aside from her Brain.” Alex Coulter, Director, Arts & Health South West. Chair, Culture, Health and Wellbeing Alliance

 “This play must be watched/shared with carers old and new and care agencies. Good to see a positive care/relationship and the importance of getting it right. Very powerful. I was completely engaged for the whole piece” Claire Angerson, Person Centred Planning, Bristol Community Links North. “Sticking up for carers” Anonymous carer

 “Professional carers are hidden from view, yet are at the heart of support to people with disabilities or disabling illness, particularly dementia, helping them to live at home as long as possible. This play portrays the complex relationship between a carer and a woman – a retired doctor – living with dementia. Mutual respect, misunderstandings, anger, beauty, frustration, jokes and, above all, love, drew me into this poignant play with beautiful acting and even a brain puppet.”Gene Feder, Professor of primary health care Centre for Academic Primary CarePopulation Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol

 “Everyone involved as Commissioners of care services or as carers should immerse themselves in this play.  You will forever see “Caring” in a new light. I was immediately captivated by the scene and the setting – familiar to me as a GP. Difficulty in gaining access to the patient’s house using door codes has been part of my lived experience for many years. The conversation between Silva Lining and her carer, the profound insights and astonishing puppetry engaged me throughout.” Dr Malcolm Rigler FRSPH, Health Ambassador at: www.patients-association.com

Opportunities to see the play:

Tandem Conference on Sept 20th

Nottingham Contemporary on Sept 21st

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“Letter to my grandchild”, for the older person who would like to get connected the easy way.

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At the end of 2017, I ran a pilot project at 65 High Street, Nailsea, inviting participants to throw themselves into technology, sometimes for the first time. They’d create something creative and satisfying – a photo book letter to their grandchild or any young person, including some written text in the form of brief stories. It was a project that pushed both participants and myself out of our comfort zones, but the results were more than worth it. Part of the course was looking at imaginative story creation, construction and structure and other exercises I’ve used in previous creative writing courses. This was an essential part of the course, though because of time constraints, in most sessions this became secondary to the IT skills learning.

Nailsea town Clerk Ian Morrell and I have been in conversation for several years over the importance of arts-in-health, and ways of introducing some creative and community activities skills to address wider community needs in the town. All this whilst providing something which Nailsea residents themselves would welcome, enjoy and accept. The council were due to launch their new resource – 65 High Street, an informal community digital hub supported by The Good Thing Foundation. I wanted to invent a course to work into this launch, and encourage people through the door. The course was free except for a small contribution to the cost of printing the books.

Nine beautiful, ambitious photos books have been made, a plethora of skills have been learned and a community has been created, both live and online. We had a Christmas party where participants received their books, shared mince pies and drinks.

Much of the feedback, and a lot of anecdotal comments during the course are helpful to learn from and take forward, including comments about the space and having an assistant in the room: all to be considered carefully in developments of the course. All ten participants would recommend a friend to come on the same course, or already had. Participants also expressed that they wanted another ongoing course for themselves.

Everyone, naturally, had sessions that were more pleasurable or useful for them than others. However, those who came regularly and experienced the week by week build up of skills, expressed appreciation at the planning and teaching – ‘It was a great course. Elspeth kept the momentum going well.’

Gratifying for me of course, but the most rewarding thing of all was to see the end products, the books, and to see the faces of the participant learners when they received them. One, aged 85, who had arrived with few technical skills, created a stunning 50 page photo book, printed multiple times for her grandchildren. Her family commented that she generally found the Christmas period hard, but this year was different: she’d loved researching, gathering materials and learning the skills to make the book and her spirits were high. Another wrote to me to say she’d given the books to her grandchildren and they’d loved them. I bet.

 I regularly asked participants what it was they wanted to get out of the sessions and what they were learning. Three areas quickly showed themselves to be important, so I concentrated on these:

  1. Learning technical skills
  2. Finding more creative ways of making photo books, and learning story-telling skills
  3. Being part of a community, countering loneliness and isolation.

Some participants would have, no doubt, preferred the sessions to stay on one or other of the points above, but everyone understood that we were a reasonably large group with different needs; we could have spent each two hours going down 15 different routes. Everyone in the feedback forms said they’d achieved a) some said they’d achieved b) and the majority ticked c).

My personal interest lies most firmly in b) and c). I don’t particularly enjoy IT myself, except in so much that it can enable creativity and enhance communication. So why did I run this course? I believe that sometimes the best people to teach a subject are those who find that subject challenging: they don’t take the learning steps for granted. If you can keep in mind the achievement of the result of your labour, i.e. a beautiful photo book of your life that you’ve made yourself, then you are more likely to sidestep your own horror of technology. To enhance the learning experience for the participants, I invited in an IT teaching expert twice in the process. He did a grand job and I learned a lot from him, for example how to effectively address those in the group who are living with conditions that inhibit learning. Humour and gentle repetition are large factors in this.

At the beginning of the workshops it was clear that most participants were bemused by the ipads, and the app. By the end, some of them were irritated by the constraints of both. This could be said to be a mark of how much they’d learned: they were keen to get onto the next level of learning. One participant bought a tablet after the second session and she went on to take great advantage of the facilities at 65 High Street, learning many IT skills.

On asking learners to write about what they’d learned, these were some of their comments:

‘I learned ever such a lot about myself doing this course’

‘Being an absolute novice at technology I was really thrilled to discover that it’s not so frightening after all.’

‘I learned so much from the way the book was made.’

‘How lovely to look back on family experiences’.

‘I learned the concept of the make up of a book. I would love to do more in the future.’

Several of the participants have offered to be volunteers for further sessions, which could be a good way of reusing the skills they have learned and for them to cement their own skills and learn some more. Creating photo books in time for Christmas presents was a good motivator and goal.

So, my tips for future similar projects are…

Explore several different photo apps. The one we used provided a simple way to get to grips with the technology of the ipad (when the app was working), though I think for some people it was a bit pedestrian, and this may be because it was developed for care homes.

Ensure you have an extra person in the room to help with minor (but very time consuming) niggles that people have with problems on the app, or just simple technical issues people have with their own devices. Things like not remembering their passwords, not getting past an Apple ID screen. I’d originally planned for teenagers or grandchildren to join the sessions to act as technical advisors. The sessions were held on school days so this wasn’t possible if we were to complete before Christmas. Minor technical hitches were frustrating. It would have been easier if all of the devices that we were using had been the same. Another reason I needed more help was that some learners had memory problems, others coordination challenges, and the range of ability ranged from one end to the other.

Provide alternative activities for learners who are not so open to creative activities. The first session involved making hand written letters to a grandchild was a great way of setting up ideas for the course for most people, and set off imaginations. People took photos of the letters and used them in their books. Another time I will provide an alternative activity, as one person made it clear that being creative wasn’t their cup of tea.

Learners were invited to contribute to pay for the printing of their photobook. I took participants’ advice and went to local printer Adroit, who gave a great price for a spiral bound photo book. This did mean more work for me but meant we were able to order multiple copies.

It’s essential to ensure that all participants can hear properly. Table layout helps, plus if possible choose a space with appropriate acoustics.

Working in pairs to explain what each person is doing helps consolidate learning.

On a course like this, which builds knowledge week to week, people need to be encouraged to come every week. I wonder whether a small financial contribution would help?

One learner, a retired teacher, wrote to me afterwards: ‘I think up to 12 people all with different skills and needs is a lot to be expected of you.’ I think she was probably right! However, I trust that some of the above considerations would make another course not only possible and easier to manage, but be even more successful.

As an arts-in-health practitioner, I was a bit frustrated not to have much time on the storytelling aspects of the course. However I loved pioneering this project, and in particular working with these wonderful people. It was rewarding to see important events in their life emerge visually on the screen, then printed in a book, to celebrate with them along with the welcoming staff at 65 High Street and to feel I was part of the beginning of something new for them.

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“So – was it therapeutic?”

I met Jessa Fairbrother today at a nourishing movement workshop called Flummery Room run by Brenda Waite at The Island in Bristol. Beautiful sessions: Brenda is generous and gentle in how she leads and she manages to encourage us to give something of ourselves, without even asking. Working together, our bodies moving in space to silence or music, we explore repetition, pauses, distance, folding and unfolding. All of us in the group have a chance to get to know ourselves better and to perhaps discover something about each other too. All of this is beyond words, although words are not banned, and they may appear at times in the space too. Something is freed up and we remember how to play again.
At the end there is a chance to talk to some of the other participants; I like that the talk comes after the getting to know another person a little through their movement and how they move with others.
Jessa told me a little about her work – photographs, embroidery, her themes – I became curious. Now home, I’m meant to be sanding down my front door ready to be painted, but how much more enjoyable it is to be reading some of Jessa’s blog posts – nuggets of inspiration and observation. Here is one.

https://jessafairbrother.wordpress.com/2017/09/25/so-was-it-therapeutic/

Persephone: Jenny Joseph

RIP Jenny Joseph.

Jenny Joseph’s Obituary in The Guardian

Jenny Joseph is a name I’m familiar with. It’s on the spine of a book that’s always on my book shelf, and is now on my bedside table, to read for the first time as an adult.  When I was 15, Neil Astley of the newly formed Bloodaxe Books asked me whether I’d like to be on the cover and the back of Jenny’s new book ‘Persephone’.

The pouty photos were taken and tinted by Irene Reddish, and I got paid something like £60 (this was a lot to me, we’re talking about June 1986). Unusually, there’s also a photo story in the middle, with models – my friends – Diana and Judith Taylor, Farne Conway, Fay Gilder, Thomas Gilder and my first boyfriend’s dad, Roger Neville. My life mentor and friend Moira Conway took the pictures for the photo story in the coffee shop of my mother’s bookshop, The Bookhouse, in Newcastle Upon Tyne.